Deborah Quazzo joins the Remind Board of Directors

Remind, a leading K-12 communication

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Remind, a leading K-12 communication platform, announced today that Deborah Quazzo has joined the company's Board of Directors. As managing partner at venture capital firm GSV Acceleration, Quazzo brings more than 20 years of experience in the education sector to Remind, including a term on the Chicago Board of Education. "We're excited for Deborah to bring a ground-up perspective along with a thoughtful, high-level view of the sector," said Remind CEO Brian Grey. "Her background as an investor and adviser in education will be invaluable as Remind continues to gain traction in schools and districts." Remind, which is currently used in over 90 percent of public school districts in the United States, introduced a paid product for schools and districts earlier this year. "I've been very impressed by how Remind has leveraged the network effects of K-12 penetration into a district sales model," Quazzo said. "But I was also delighted to see the passion that educators have for the product. It's an offering that makes a teacher's day more efficient, streamlines their communication, and provides more instructional time—that's an important impact." One of the few female board directors in education technology, Quazzo also believes strongly in the value of diverse decision-making bodies. "Better decisions come from a diversity of views," she said. "It changes the breadth and tenor of conversations and helps identify blind spots that you can't see with a more homogenous group." To Quazzo, this perspective is especially important in the education sector. "When you're building and selling a product into the K-12 system, which consists of extremely diverse groups of students, educators, and administrators, it's important to understand different communities and needs," she said. "And I think Remind is well-positioned to continue making a big difference."

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Pluralsight Makes Si …

New Capabilities Replace Traditional Methods

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New Capabilities Replace Traditional Methods of Benchmarking Talent With a More Efficient Way to Quantify and Develop Team's Technology Skills. Pluralsight, the enterprise technology learning platform, today announced a new skills assessment and development suite that replaces traditional methods for assessing and benchmarking technology talent. The new suite, which includes Pluralsight IQ, advanced skills analytics, and advanced channels analytics, is designed to provide technology professionals and leaders with a fast, accurate, and affordable way to measure technology skills. The new suite uses machine learning and modern testing theory to significantly reduce the amount of time and cost usually dedicated to validating technology skills. Software engineers must re-develop their skills every 12 to 18 months to keep their skills from becoming antiquated, according to Deloitte. This fast pace of technological change makes it difficult for technologists and organizations to remain relevant and competitive. Pluralsight's new skills assessment and development suite empowers individuals and enterprises to identify where their knowledge lies and to develop a plan for acquiring new or strengthening existing skill sets. "Pluralsight IQ is the most advanced assessment solution for technical skills in the market, and will be rapidly adopted by IT professionals to validate their technical expertise," said Cushing Anderson, program vice president at IDC. "Learning only matters if it turns into skills that can be used on a project, to solve a problem or to build a product," said Aaron Skonnard, co-founder and CEO of Pluralsight. "We developed these new capabilities to give technology professionals and leaders real, quantified and actionable insights for developing the skills required to create world-changing products and solutions."

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This Startup Adds …

One day last year, about 30 fifth graders at

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One day last year, about 30 fifth graders at Seldens Landing Elementary School in Virginia were issued tablets and asked to answer questions about cyber-bullying. They started with the statement: “Sticks and stones may break your bones, but words will never hurt you.” Next, the kids had to take a poll: Is that really true or false? As students punched in their answers, the tablets relayed the results in near real time, anonymously, to their teacher. There to assist was Alex Springer-Post, who runs the school’s “discovery lab”–basically, she’s the in-house tech expert for digitally enhanced lessons–who was shocked by the results: Turns out, 65% of kids marked ‘True.’ The saying might work for playground comebacks, but they’re not true at all, especially in the age of cyber-bullying, where the taunting can go wide and feel unrelenting.

Coursera, an online learning

Stamping out student plagiarism is

ClassDojo today is announcing that

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