This Job Platform Is For Undergrads Who Get Nowhere On LinkedIn

The days of “it’s not what you know, it’s who

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The days of “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know” may be nearing an end now that college students can Handshake their way to better job opportunities. Ever heard of Michigan Tech? The engineering school, located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, is a full day’s drive from the nearest metro areas of Detroit and Chicago, and as a result might not be top of mind for corporate recruiters outside the Midwest. As Garrett Lord sees it, that’s a problem for many college students whose socioeconomics and alma matter (and yes, one often dictates the other) make it harder to clinch their dream jobs right out of college. So in 2014, Lord cofounded Handshake with his former Michigan Tech classmates Scott Ringwelski and Ben Christensen, a “first LinkedIn,” in Lord’s words, that automatically equips college students with bare-bones professional profiles and lets employers get job listings in front of them earlier. Handshake’s cofounders see the platform as a counterargument to the so-called “pipeline problem,” the notion that there just aren’t enough skilled candidates–especially among underrepresented minorities–to hire for open jobs. That still-widespread belief lets recruiters justify retreading the same select handful of name-brand schools in their search for qualified hires. “We want to help all students,” emphasizes Lord, who himself managed to score an internship and job offer at Palantir, but saw how others might not have the resources or resilience to do the same. So Handshake was built to automate many of the functions of a university career center, to match students with more internships, career fairs, and job opportunities based on their majors and interests.

Coursera, an online learning

Stamping out student plagiarism is

ClassDojo today is announcing that

Zuckerberg-backed An …

Andela, a startup that’s setting out to train

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Andela, a startup that’s setting out to train Africa’s best software developers and connect them with the world’s biggest technology companies, has raised $40 million in a series C round of funding. The round was led by African VC firm CRE Venture Capital, with participation from GV (Google’s VC arm), the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), Salesforce Ventures, Spark Capital, DBL Partners, Amplo, and TLcom Capital. This takes Andela’s total funding past the $80 million mark and comes a little more than a year after the company nabbed $24 million in funding from major names that include GV and Facebook cofounder Mark Zuckerberg’s new foundation — Andela was CZI’s first-ever investment. Founded in 2014, Andela runs a pretty unique program, insofar as it pairs some of Africa’s top students with companies seeking the best tech talent. It is also very selective. With more than 70,000 applicants across the continent so far, Andela’s six-week vetting process has heralded just a 0.7 percent acceptance rate — it really is about finding the best of the best. Andela’s official HQ is in New York, but it has local hubs in Nigeria, Kenya, and Uganda that have helped the company hire around 500 developers, to date. Those selected spend six months in a “rigorous onboarding program” before being matched with one of Andela’s partner companies. “Andela is investing in our continent’s future technology leaders, who are already playing a much-needed role in solving both African and global problems,” explained Seni Sulyman, country director of Andela Nigeria. “With each new partnership, we are simultaneously proving to the global tech industry that brilliance is evenly distributed irrespective of gender, culture, or nationality. As we unleash an entire generation of technologists, we will secure Africa’s role as an equal partner working alongside the rest of the world to advance human potential.”

Coursera, an online learning

Stamping out student plagiarism is

ClassDojo today is announcing that

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